Miniature Tigers? What Fun?! (A concert review)

23 Apr

The most wonderful thing about the House of Blues in Boston–is that there is a restaurant attached. Why,do you ask, is this the best thing? Three words: Pass the Line.

For my birthday gift this year, I asked to go to a concert at the House of Blues. Not just any concert: Fun. If you don’t know who Fun is–tune in to your local radio station some time. Or better yet, watch some television and keep yourself posted for the Chevy Sonic commercial with all the crazy car stunts. That, my dear reader, is Fun. The song everyone– from the tweens to the moms–seem to be singing lately is ‘We are young’. Frankly, it’s a bit disappointing that this is the song that caught everyone’s attention, since they have far better songs to offer. Nevertheless, since this commercial aired during the Superbowl this year, they’ve become suddenly and overwhelmingly popular.

So buying a meal at the House of Blues restaurant was a small price to pay for the opportunity to cut the seemingly endless line of eager fans at the door to get in. My boyfriend and I were one of the first guests inside, and the venue is by far one of my favorites. Small and warmly lit, the walls are lined symmetrically with artwork that looks as if small children completed them. The walls are painted in warm colors, and the stage is adorned with multiple religious symbols and the phrase “Who do you love” is framed at center stage. Arranged in three tiers of viewing, a bar adorns each level, back lit and glowing in the dim but welcoming light. The bottom level is standing room only, and features the authentic crowd-crushing capacity that most concerts are known for. I personally prefer to be able to see the stage with ease (as I am a regrettably short 5’4′–it is almost guaranteed that someone will be taller than me and will block my view of the stage.) and prefer the mezzanine level. There are two options for this level: standing room and ticketed seating. For both Fun and last year’s Panic at the Disco concert, I preferred standing room, just simply because you can wriggle closer to the stage if you get there early.   The standing room is to the left and right sides of the stage, and the seating is in the back. Above this level is similar, but shorter in length and can hold less people. I suppose this would be the best bet for those of you who find crowds extremely unpleasant but still love loud music.

The doors opened at 6, but I felt as if we were eagerly waiting, leaning against the railing for about an hour before the opening band, The Miniature Tigers began their set. Having been curious about this opening act, I had looked into the Miniature Tigers prior to attending the concert. From what I heard in their recordings, I doubted I would enjoy them. (Though nothing will ever surpass the horror that was Foxy Shazam. They played with their feet…literally…) Yet, I ended up being pleasantly surprised in that the Miniature Tigers were much better to listen to live than they were in recording. (A rare find–like a Charizard card in the original 150 decks.) However, I always find that the opening band is supposed to complete one simple task–warm up the audience for the band they really came to see. The Miniature Tigers seemed to fall a bit short in this respect. True, their lead singer did his best to get the audience interacting, but due to their somewhat mellow Modest Mouse meets The Beatles and Whites Stripes sound–it was difficult to get the audience pumped. Their last song, ‘Sex on the Regular’ was catchy enough to get a little “wiggle” (as the lead singer put it ) into the crowd. After re-listening to them, I think they may be something I could even get into.(And apparently their song ‘The Wolf’ was in  that movie Easy A.)

It was a bit of a long wait between the opening act and the main event–but was decidedly well worth it. Per when I witnessed Fun for the first time last year (At the previously mentioned Panic at the Disco concert) the lead singer, Nate Ruess, burst onto the stage full of energy and enthusiasm. This time, Nate sported a bright green Celtics Jersey, Rhondo’s to be specific, and proceeded to admit to the crowd that he wore the Jersey everywhere and that Fun had deep roots in Boston.

All members of the band seemed high energy and their joy was contagious. The crowd hooted and hollered, being encouraged by the band to sing along and make friends with strangers beside them. Fun lives up to their name with ease, and was a highly interactive and personable experience. Even in a crowd of easily hundreds, I felt as if I was interacting with the band. (If not the whole room.) They opened with the song, “One foot” (which I felt was an odd start out of the gate due to it’s strange almost grim lyrics) and ended with an encore of their newest song “Some Nights”. From start to end the energy was up, and Nate worked the crowd with the skill of a master performer. Each song was introduced like a personal friend of the band, and even the parents of the guitarist and the drummer were in the audience and brought to attention. The audience left with grins on their faces and I left with a skip in my step. Fun is by far one of my most favorite concert experiences yet, and I look forward to their next appearance nearby.

http://www.ournameisfun.com/

http://miniaturetigers.com/

http://www.houseofblues.com/venues/clubvenues/boston/

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